October 2008

Sharing links from Konqueror, including to IRC

I follow the main feeds of a couple social news sites (namely Digg, Reddit and Muti). When I find an article which I like, I go back and vote it up on the site. However, when I come across good articles via other sources, I don't submit them to these news sites (or try to find out if they've already been submitted) simply because it's too much effort.

When I started aggregating my activity on these sites on my blog and on FriendFeed, I needed a way to share pages that I didn't get to via one of these social news sites. I ended up setting up Delicious because I found a plugin for Konqueror which made it easy to bookmark pages.

I still wanted to solve the original problem though, and so started looking for an easy way to submit links to these sites from Konqueror. Konqueror has a feature called service menus which allows you to add entries to the context menu of files. I then needed to work out how to submit links to these services, which turned out to simply involve loading a URL with a query parameter specifying the link you want to share.

I created entries for Reddit, Digg, Muti, Delicious, Facebook and Google Bookmarks. These take you to the submission page of the service where you can fill in the title1. Digg and Reddit will show existing submissions if the link has already been submitted.

I often share links on IRC, and wondered if I could integrate that with my menu. It turns out that WeeChat has a control socket, and I could send messages by piping them to the socket. I therefore wrote a script which prompted me for a headline or excerpt using kdialog, and then sent the link to the specified channel. My menu now looks like this:

sharemenu.png

If you want to set this up yourself, download share.desktop and put it in ~/.kde/share/apps/konqueror/servicemenus. If you want the icons, download shareicons.tar.gz, extract them somewhere, and fix the paths in social.desktop2. To setup the IRC feature (assuming you're using WeeChat), download postirc.sh and save it in ~/bin/. You will need to change the commands in social.desktop depending on the servers and channels you wish to use.


  1. One shortcoming is that the title of the page is not automatically filled in. 

  2. I couldn't work out how to use relative paths, or ~. 

September GeekDinner

I attended my second GeekDinner on Monday evening. It was a fairly small occasion with about 30 people turning up at Asoka in Gardens.

Joe gave a very intriguing talk on lifestyle design. Some of the points included work less and cheat, which I didn't really agree with, but the basic idea of doing the things you love was good. Jonathan then spoke about actually doing something with your ideas, which was quite inspiring. I don't really get "big" ideas, but I'm going to try anyway.

The other Jonathan showed us Half Price Tuesdays which is an idea he's been working on. I'm helping with the alpha test and it's looking very promising. Kerry-Anne then did a fantastic slideshow karaoke prepared by Jonathan. She gave us some tips on how to survive a GeekDinner talk, but unfortunately needs to implement some of those tips herself :-P

Many thanks to Asoka for hosting us, and to Perderberg for the wine sponsorship. I hope to see more people attend next time.

Windows users finally get circular scrolling

When I first started using Linux four years ago, one of the most useful features I discovered was circular scrolling on touchpads. (For those that don't know, this allows you to scroll up and down by moving your finger in a circle.) Traditional scrolling now feels very clumsy, and I find it awkward when using a laptop which doesn't have this feature (such as those running Windows). According to the changelog for the XOrg/XFree86 Synaptics driver, this feature was added in February 2004.

I happened to come across the news today that Synaptics have added a feature called ChiralTouch Technology to the latest version of their Windows drivers. This so-called "technology" provides "the ability to scroll continuously with a circular motion." This basically means that they have finally gotten round to implementing a very useful feature which Linux users have had for over four years.

In some respects proprietary software is way behind FOSS in terms of features and usability, and this example also shows how proprietary software uses ideas which were first implemented in FOSS.

Vim syntax highlighting for irssi IRC logs

When I occasionally read [IRC][] logs saved by [irssi][], I find the lack of colouring rather annoying and find that I can't read them very quickly. I finally got round to writing a syntax highlighting plugin for [Vim][] in order to correct this. The colours could probably do with some improvement, but it's much better than before.

In case anyone else finds this useful, I have attached the plugin to this post. To use it, save [irssilog.vim][irssilog.vim] in ~/.vim/syntax/ and enter the following command to use it with the current file.

:set syntax=irssilog

If you want Vim to automatically detect the file type, add the following to ~/.vim/ftdetect/irssilog.vim1.

au BufRead,BufNewFile */irclogs*.log    set filetype=irssilog

  1. This relies on the logs being stored in the default location of ~/irclogs/